Hotel and Flight Information for NASPH 2019 Conference

Dear NASPH members, this is the information for the hotel for the conference in Eugene 3-5 October. You will also find flight information.

Please call and make reservations at the hotel of your choice as soon as possible. We have three home games in a row, so Saturday will be booked quickly.

  • Best Western New Oregon, 1655 Franklin Blvd 541-683-3669 $171 per night plus taxes
  • University Inn & Suites, 1857 Franklin Blvd 541-342-4804 $152 per night plus taxes
  • Days Inn by Wyndam Eugene, 1859 Franklin Blvd 541-342-6383 $152 per night plus taxes
  • Best Western Greentree Inn, 1759 Franklin Blvd 541-485-2727 $152 per night plus taxes
  • Graduate Eugene (Formerly Hilton), 66 E 6th Avenue  541-342-2000 $232 per night plus taxes

These prices are subject to change of course, but these are the prices listed for Oct 3-6, 2019 as of today.

You should fly into Eugene, there are flights that connect with main airports, such as Seattle, L.A., Chicago, and Denver. Depending on the hotel you will have a 20-minute taxi ride or a hotel shuttle. Another option is to fly into Portland. The airport is on the Northside of the city, so you are looking at a two-hour car ride to Eugene. There is a shuttle from the airport to Eugene, but it runs at specific times (https://groometransportation.com/portland-airport/).

Sessions will take place on campus. Locations TBA. We will have the program for you shortly.

With best wishes, and looking forward to seeing you soon in Oregon,

Alejandro, Carolyn, Cynthia, and Lawrence

2019 NASPH Call For Papers–June 15 Extended Submission Deadline

NORTH AMERICAN SOCIETY FOR PHILOSOPHICAL HERMENEUTICS

14th Annual Meeting, October 3-5, 2019

Keynote Speakers:

Kristin Gjesdal (Temple University) Charles Scott (Penn State) James Risser (Seattle University)

Papers on all themes related to philosophical hermeneutics are welcome. Sessions will consist of 30-minute presentations of papers followed by discussion. In the spirit of dialogue and meaningful reflection, presenters will be invited to make their papers available to be read in advance. While time to present papers is limited, submissions may be between 3,000 and 5,000 words. Papers in English, formatted for blind review, must be submitted electronically to nasphermeneutics@gmail.com. Attachments in .doc, .pdf, or .rtf format are preferable. The new extended submission deadline is June 15, 2019. Papers by graduate students on relevant themes will be considered for the Hans-Georg Gadamer Essay Prize. Please indicate if you wish to be considered. Lastly, direct inquiries about the conference and the society to avallega@uoregon.edu or consult our website at http://www.nasph.org.

2019 NASPH Call For Papers: June 22 Extended Submission Deadline

North American Society for Philosophical Hermeneutics

14th Annual Meeting, October 3–5, 2019, University of Oregon

Keynote Speakers: Kristin Gjesdal (Temple University) Charles Scott (Penn State)
James Risser (Seattle University)

Papers on all themes related to philosophical hermeneutics are welcome. Sessions will consist of 30-minute presentations of papers followed by discussion. In the spirit of dialogue and meaningful reflection, presenters will be invited to make their papers available to be read in advance. While time to present papers is limited, submissions may be between 3,000 and 5,000 words. Papers in English, formatted for blind review, must be submitted electronically to nasphermeneutics@gmail.com. Attachments in .doc, .pdf, or .rtf format are preferable. The new extended submission deadline is June 22, 2019. Papers by graduate students on relevant themes will be considered for the Hans-Georg Gadamer Essay Prize. Please indicate if you wish to be considered. Lastly, direct inquiries about the conference and the society to avallega@uoregon.edu or consult our website at http://www.nasph.org.

NASPH was formed in 2005 in order to further the study of philosophical hermeneutics and to foster dialogue in light of difference. While honoring the rootedness of philosophical hermeneutics in the work of Hans-Georg Gadamer we find that the force and value of philosophical hermeneutics lie in the development of dialogue that brings life to history and illuminates contemporary issues.

CFP for the journal Philosophies: Special Issue “Being-with Ethics: Mitsein and the Possibility of a Hermeneutic Ethics”

A call for papers/submissions for an upcoming special edition of the journal Philosophies on hermeneutic ethics can be found here

Special Issue Information

What can we say about an ethics grounded in hermeneutics? Most fundamentally, hermeneutics is concerned with the problems of interpretation and understanding. Historically, hermeneutics was concerned with theories for correctly interpreting and understanding texts. Philosophical hermeneutics is the study of the assumptions and pre-judgments (the fore-structures of understanding) undergirding what we take to be the case about the world, about ourselves, and about others. That is, philosophical hermeneutics is a form of meta-philosophy. Hermeneutic ethics captures the tension often thought to exist between the idea that ethical questions are best answered on a case-by-case basis and the idea that some sort of universal moral truths do indeed exist (and, accordingly should be heeded). From a hermeneutical point of view, ethical questions (like all questions) are situated (that is, bound by the context from which they arise), but at the same time – and to the extent that we are all intimately connected not only with each other but with the world(s) we inhabit in dynamic and irrevocable ways — an ethics grounded in hermeneutics entails a profound commitment to the welfare of others as well as a way to assess the relative value of different ethical decisions.

In this issue, papers are invited on the topic of an ethics grounded in hermeneutics, broadly construed. Possible questions and issues to be addressed are (1) whether an ethics grounded in hermeneutics is possible, (2) the relationship between what ethics is and what hermeneutics is, (3) how the ethics of key hermeneuticists or hermeneutic philosophers might be compared and contrasted, (4) an exploration of the concept of Mitsein (or Being-with), (5) the role of community in an ethics grounded in hermeneutics, (6) the extent to which hermeneutics, ethics, and philosophy itself are coextensive, (7) the role of intersubjectivity in ethics, (8) the role of tradition in ethics, (9) ethics and hermeneutic dialogue, (10) hermeneutics and the other, (11) the relationship between power dynamics and the possibility of (productive) hermeneutic dialogue, (12) the possibility of hermeneutically correcting for the power dynamics in human dialogue, (13) what a hermeneutically legitimate ethical decision-making process might look like, and (14) any other related topic.

Prof. Dr. Tina Fernandes Botts

Guest Editor

2018 NASPH Conference Program and Poster

The conference program for the 2018 NASPH conference in Naperville, IL is now available for download. You may access the conference program and conference poster here. (We hope to have our new website up and running in the next few months. Until then, our apologies for the two-step download process.)

NASPH at SPEP: What are Hermeneuts for?

NORTH AMERICAN SOCIETY FOR PHILOSOPHICAL HERMENEUTICS

Room 105, Thursday, Oct. 18th 9:00 a.m.–12:00 p.m.

Dennis Schmidt, Western Sydney University, “What are hermeneuts for?”

Followed by a roundtable discussion with:

Peg Birmingham, DePaul University; Theodore George, Texas A&M University; James Risser, Seattle University; Charles Scott, Pennsylvania State University; Anne O’Byrne, Stony Brook University; Alejandro A. Vallega, University of Oregon.